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PSL's Daily Standup with Juan Ruiz

In one year, I've faced so many challenges and done so many things I never envisioned myself doing. I wasn't given the opportunity to do these things in other places, but at PSL, I feel like the sky's the limit.

 
Juan Ruiz, DevOps Champion at PSL

The PSL community is made up of wonderful, smart, highly driven, and creative professionals; the kind of people that get up in the morning determined to make a positive impact and help promote change for the good. At PSL, we love these kinds of people and we do whatever possible to help them learn, grow and reach new heights. 

In today's Daily Standup, we interview Juan Ruiz, a DevOps Champion at PSL.

Juan Ruiz, DevOps Champion at PSL

How long have you been at PSL? 

It will be 1 year next month. I'm excited about that, especially because I've been doing way more than I ever thought I could. The fast-paced environment and the fact that you're encouraged to pursue your interests, shows that PSL gives you the chance to actually make a very tangible impact. In one year, I've faced so many challenges and done so many things I never envisioned myself doing. I wasn't given the opportunity to do these things in other places, but at PSL, I feel like the sky's the limit.

How would you describe your day job to a child?

Let's imagine that technology and software are cars and roads. I help design roads so cars can move faster, so more cars can move through the roads, so people can produce cheaper cars that will still be good and safe enough. That's usually what I do.

What are your biggest professional challenges?

Currently, the team is having to regain a client's trust after a change in management. Generating that bond with the customer is vital for the project to be successful, so we're working hard to reestablish that confidence. At the same time, the internal efforts of boosting company-wide DevOps adoption, helping colleagues develop their career paths in DevOps, and keeping our DevOps and Performance study groups active.

What gets you out of bed in the morning, ready for another day at PSL?

What gets me up in the morning is the sheer momentum, the adrenaline rush, or that feeling of being able to do so much. I would definitely like to have more hours in my day, just to get to all of the things I want to do. There's this idea that says that if you have a job, there are too many hours in the day, but if you have a career, there aren't enough. And that's the place where I am right now. I get up thinking that there's so much that I have to do—and that I get to do! I'm never in a position where I know everything. Instead, it's this feeling that if you choose, you can delve into the unknown and tests the limits of what you think you can do, and actually do more.  

Beyond making good software and exceeding client expectations, PSL wants you to own your own performance, expand and grow as a professional, and be open and honest with yourself and your coworkers.

Juan Ruiz, DevOps Champion at PSL

What advice would you give to new PSL employees?

Don't restrain yourselves. Don't assume this company is like any other company. I had some preconceptions coming into PSL, but I've found that this is the place where I've felt most comfortable, enjoyed the most freedom, and where they actually practice what they preach. Beyond making good software and exceeding client expectations, PSL wants you to own your own performance, expand and grow as a professional, and be open and honest with yourself and your coworkers. Technology can be rough, and angry clients happen all the time, but as long as you're honest with your team, PSL will have your back and help you get to the level you want to reach. 

What's the coolest, newest, most interesting thing you've recently learned?

I'd say, learning how to work with new talent—interns, intermediate or junior engineers, etc. Understanding that they might think differently or be motivated differently, and how to mentor them accordingly. I've started to hold myself accountable for whether they achieve their goals or not, and started thinking about growth, both individual and company-wise. Meaning, that if I help these individuals to learn and grow, it will affect the company positively because we'd have more people capable of doing good things, finding new opportunities, and stuff like that.

New technologies come and go but having good principles will always be relevant.


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Does PSL sound like a good fit for you? Check out our job opportunities!

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Sunday, 16 June 2019

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